About Vein Disease

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, within the National Institutes of Health, US Health and Human Services:  https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/vv/related

Vein Problems Related to Varicose Veins

Many vein problems are related to varicose veins, such as telangiectasias (tel-AN-juh-ek-TA-ze-uhs), spider veins, varicoceles (VAR-i-ko-seals), and other vein problems.

Telangiectasias

Telangiectasias are small clusters of blood vessels. They’re usually found on the upper body, including the face.

These blood vessels appear red. They may form during pregnancy, and often they develop in people who have certain genetic disorders, viral infections, or other conditions, such as liver disease.

Because telangiectasias can be a sign of a more serious condition, see your doctor if you think you have them.

Spider Veins

Spider veins are a smaller version of varicose veins and a less serious type of telangiectasias. Spider veins involve the capillaries, the smallest blood vessels in the body.

Spider veins often appear on the legs and face. They’re red or blue and usually look like a spider web or tree branch. These veins usually aren’t a medical concern.  However many people opt for an esthetic treatment to eliminate spider veins.

Other Related Vein Problems

Other types of varicose veins include venous lakes, reticular veins, and hemorrhoids. Venous lakes are varicose veins that appear on the face and neck. Reticular veins are flat blue veins often seen behind the knees. Hemorrhoids are varicose veins in and around the anus.

Varicose Veins

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, within the National Institute of Health:  https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/vv

What Are Varicose Veins?

Varicose (VAR-i-kos) veins are swollen, twisted veins that you can see just under the surface of the skin. These veins usually occur in the legs, but they also can form in other parts of the body.

Varicose veins are a common condition. They usually cause few signs and symptoms. Sometimes varicose veins cause mild to moderate pain, blood clots, skin ulcers (sores), or other problems.

Overview

Veins are blood vessels that carry blood from your body’s tissues to your heart. Your heart pumps the blood to your lungs to pick up oxygen. The oxygen-rich blood then is pumped to your body through blood vessels called arteries.

From your arteries, the blood flows through tiny blood vessels called capillaries, where it gives up its oxygen to the body’s tissues. Your blood then returns to your heart through your veins to pick up more oxygen.

Veins have one-way valves that help keep blood flowing toward your heart. If the valves are weak or damaged, blood can back up and pool in your veins. This causes the veins to swell, which can lead to varicose veins.

Many factors can raise your risk for varicose veins. Examples of these factors include family history, older age, gender, pregnancy, overweight or obesity, lack of movement, and leg trauma.

Varicose veins are treated with lifestyle changes and medical procedures. The goals of treatment are to relieve symptoms, prevent complications, and improve appearance.

Outlook

Varicose veins usually don’t cause medical problems. If they do, your doctor may simply suggest making lifestyle changes.

Sometimes varicose veins cause pain, blood clots, skin ulcers, or other problems. If this happens, your doctor may recommend one or more medical procedures. Some people choose to have these procedures to improve the way their veins look or to relieve pain.

Many treatments for varicose veins are quick and easy and don’t require a long recovery.

  • Treatments Provided Exclusively by Board Certified Physicians
  • State of the Art Technology
  • Individual Treatment Plans
  • Over Three Decades of Experience
  • Practice Dedicated to Leg and Vein Care
  • Non-Invasive Procedures